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Positioned at the crossroads between Eastern Europe and the near-Mid East, Georgia once was part of the famed Silk Road.  Geographic neighbors include Turkey, Armenia, Azerbaijan, and Russia; Georgia is bounded on the west by the Black Sea. Since geography contributes to its history and to culture, Georgia’s place in the world means distinctive food with an intriguing blend of East meets West. 

Georgian food is based on the contrast of spicy and hot. Vegetables are widely used in separate dishes and as a complement to meat dishes. Georgian meat dishes can be made from pork, lamb, beef, poultry, etc. Most vegetable dishes are prepared from the beans, eggplant, cabbage, cauliflower, beets and tomatoes. Often the recipes are seasoned with spices. Georgian cuisine uses well familiar products and varying proportions of ingredients such as walnut, aromatic herbs, garlic, vinegar, red pepper, pomegranate grains, barberries and other spices. Georgian food is about  mixing and matching such Mediterranean and Near-East ingredients as yogurt, olive oil, lamb and pomegranates with such European staples as cheese, plums, peaches, apples, cherries, and corn.  Beans and rice seem to take on a new life in the hands of Georgian cooks. 

There is a difference between the traditional cuisine of Western and Eastern Georgia. For the West Georgia is characterized by the use of Mchadi (bread made from corn flour), as well as corn meal or a special meal from a special kind of millet -Gherghili, cooked mush - Ghomi, which add cheese Sulguni(Suluguni). East Georgia is characterized by the widespread use of the wheat bread. In addition, in Western Georgia, the majority of meat is poultry.

 

This introduction has been sourced from the following sites: Please visit them for more information.

Georgian Cuisine

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