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Celiac disease can be difficult to diagnose because it affects people differently. There are about 300 known symptoms which may occur in the digestive system or other parts of the body. Some people with celiac disease have no symptoms at all. However, all people with celiac disease are still at risk for long-term complications, whether or not they display any symptoms.

The condition is genetic. If an immediate family member has celiac disease, the chance you may have it increases to 1 in 22. Because so many cases of celiac disease go undiagnosed, family history alone is not always an accurate gauge.

Some of the more common symptoms of celiac disease include:

  • Diarrhea
  • Stomach pain
  • Fatigue
  • Joint pain
  • Weight loss
  • An itchy skin rash called dermatitis herpetiformis

Digestive symptoms are more common in infants and children. Here are the most common symptoms found in children:

  • abdominal bloating and pain
  • chronic diarrhea
  • vomiting
  • constipation
  • pale, foul-smelling, or fatty stool
  • weight loss
  • fatigue
  • irritability and behavioral issues
  • dental enamel defects of the permanent teeth
  • delayed growth and puberty
  • short stature
  • failure to thrive
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)

Adults are less likely to have digestive symptoms, with only one-third experiencing diarrhea.  Adults are more likely to have:

 

  • unexplained iron-deficiency anemia
  • fatigue
  • bone or joint pain
  • arthritis
  • bone loss or osteoporosis
  • depression or anxiety
  • tingling numbness in the hands and feet
  • seizures or migraines
  • missed menstrual periods
  • infertility or recurrent miscarriage
  • canker sores inside the mouth
  • an itchy skin rash called dermatitis herpetiformis

There are dozens of symptoms associated with celiac disease and vary from person to person. Symptoms may occur in the digestive system or in other parts of the body. Properly diagnosing celiac disease includes a medical review of your symptoms. It also involves a blood test to look for high levels of certain auto-antibodies and a biopsy of tissue from the small intestine.

This information has been sourced from : Centre for Digestive Diseases. NHS Choices. Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

and Celiac Diease Foundation.